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LTC Bullet:

Should CLTCF Publish LTCN&C?

Thursday October 19, 2000

Seattle--

For ten years, "LTC News & Comment" was the premier source of hard news and penetrating analysis on long-term care financing in the United States.

This monthly newsletter provided concise summaries of current research, timely reports on key state and federal legislation, interesting interviews, piquant editorials, and informative guest articles. We know. Center for Long-Term Care Financing staff were frequent contributors to that excellent publication.

But the real credit goes to Publisher Dale Larson and Editor George Sherman, Ph.D. They gave us all a decade of thoughtful and thought-provoking content. We owe them a vote of thanks for that. Recently, however, LTCN&C had to cease publication. Its voice--formerly heard regularly by reporters, legislators, public policy makers, and long-term care providers and insurers--is now silent.

Our basic question to readers of LTC Bullets and supporters of the Center for Long-Term Care Financing is this: Should we give LTC News & Comment new life as an on-line newsletter, available in .pdf format on a password-protected section of the Center's web site, www.centerltc.com? We need your advice and support, because the Center for Long-Term Care Financing lacks the resources to support such a publication without a reliable subscriber base.

*** If you're unfamiliar with LTCN&C, check out the last issue in .pdf format on the Center's web site at http://www.centerltc.com/ltcn_n_c.pdf ***

Publisher Larson has licensed the name and mailing list of LTCN&C to the Center for Long-Term Care Financing without charge. Publishing online is considerably more cost effective than printing and mailing hard copies. Nevertheless, the necessary web site consulting and compensation to Dr. Sherman for producing the newsletter's content are significant expenses. So, here's what we need to know from you:

Would you like to see LTCN&C revived?
If you currently subscribe, would you expect to renew when your subscription expires? (Existing subscriptions, currently lapsed, will be honored, online, if we renew publication.)
If you are not a current subscriber, would you subscribe at a rate of $150 per year, half the charge for many other newsletters of this caliber?
Would you subscribe at a deeply discounted rate, perhaps as low as $25 per year (per subscription), if you had the opportunity to do so as, or through affiliation with, a financial supporter of the Center for Long-Term Care Financing?
If you represent a company or organization that would purchase subscriptions in bulk, please advise how many subscriptions you would anticipate purchasing at the following projected rates:

***Rates for "full" corporate supporters of the Center for LTC Financing (i.e., your organization has contributed the requested amount to the Center's annual pledge drive). Contact Amy Marohn (425-467-6840; amy@centerltc.com) if you are interested in becoming a corporate supporter.

  • subscriptions: 1-100
    rate per subscription: $100
  • subscriptions: 101-500
    rate per subscription: $50
  • subscriptions: 501+
    rate per subscription: $25

***Rates for all other organizations:

  • subscriptions: 1-100
    rate per subscription: $150
  • subscriptions: 101-500
    rate per subscription: $100
  • subscriptions: 501+
    rate per subscription: $50

Through thick and thin . . .through ups like HIPAA '96's tax deductibility hopes . . . and through downs like government's near take-over of health care in 1994 . . . LTC News & Comment was there to guide us through the thickets of public policy. It inspired us when we needed encouragement. It dampened our enthusiasm when we became unrealistic. It gave a forum to practical, hard-headed experts whose message might not have gotten out otherwise. It brought an important perspective to doubters and critics who might not have heard it otherwise. It became a reliable source of data and interpretation among media sources that are so often unreliable. It became an institution . . .our institution. Shall we save LTC News & Comment?